Media Careers Conference

Every year the Careers Service puts on an event dedicated to finding out about careers within the media industry.  So if you think you’re the next Jon Snow, Arianna Huffington, or even Don Draper (see Mad Men!) then this is the conference for you. Last year the conference took place at the beginning of Easter and all students could choose two pathways and attend workshops linked to those pathways. These were: JournalismFeatured image Publishing Advertising, marketing and PR Creative industries Broadcast (TV and radio) Film and production The speakers at the conference ranged from recent alumni now working in film production through to the former Director of BBC World Service and Global News. The conference gave students the opportunity to talk with employers and alumni and find out more about different areas of the media industry. Last year speakers included representatives from

  • BBC
  • Dorling Kingsley
  • McCann Erikson
  • Films@59
  • The Sun on Sunday
  • Cardiff School of Journalism
  • Heart FM
  • Immediate Media and many more

What did the participants have to say about the conference? “I went into the Media Conference not knowing much about the Media Industry; I came out knowing more about the ins-and-outs of what a job in media entails. We heard from a wide range of people within the industry, covering journalism, social media and documentaries. They described what it takes to work in the industry, what experience you need, and what to expect from a job in media. This conference helped me understand what I do and don’t want from a career, finding out more about any job you’re considering is definitely worth doing to help point your future in the right direction for you” Madeleine (Current UoB student) How else did the course help the participants?

“I learnt about the processes and differences between jobs and companies”

“Learnt that journalism is something I’d love and learnt what to do and how to get there”

“Realise that post production is something I would really enjoy doing”

“Found a company I am interested in contacting”

“Made contacts and have a clear idea of different career paths available to me”

“Have specific areas in marketing and PR I’m interested in”

“Understand that there isn’t one set way/importance of contacts and networking”

“Eliminated some career paths and became more interested in other areas”

Media Careers Conference 2015 This year’s conference is taking place on Monday 30th & Tuesday 31st March 2015. To book your place, go to the Careers Service website “I found the media conference really helpful, mostly as it let me know that what I was doing was the right thing, and I also got a few pointers on how to get work experience.” Max, UoB Graduate 2014, now working as a Sports Journalist

How to use the Law Fair to get work experience

Original URL: http://nickbaines.wordpress.com/2009/05/13/

I am a postgraduate researcher in an arts subject (not Law!) but last October, at the Careers Service Law Fair, I managed to get a week’s work experience in a mid-sized City firm – the Holy Grail of the would-be lawyer. I got this purely through chatting to the people I met on each stand. As networking and meeting people is a great way to get a foot in the door, especially for law, I thought I’d share a bit on the blog about how I went about it.

Just ask!

I chatted to a few employers at the firm, and got (alongside a lot of free stuff) 2 business cards, and 1 offer of work experience. At the stand of the firm in question, there were a partner, a trainee and an HR person, and I tailored my questions to each of them. After talking to all three for some time, I asked the lady from HR if there was any possibility of a week, or even a day, of shadowing. She’d already offered to take my email address, and suggested I drop her an email with my CV and the practice areas I’d be interested in. She actually emailed me with a reminder before I’d had a chance to get in touch with her, and once I’d sent my CV, she arranged for me to sit in my preferred department for a week in January.

The lesson here is an old one, but it’s true: if you don’t ask, you don’t get. If you feel a conversation is going well, then why not ask? Some firms, of course, will say no, but you’ve lost nothing, and it’s worth it to get even one yes.

Research, research, research

You’ll probably have heard this already, but research is key to securing legal work experience – even informally. And preparation is vital for law fair success:

  • Before the fair, I made a list of firms I was interested in, why I was interested in them, and what questions I wanted to ask in order to find out more.
  • I also had a think about more general questions I could ask. For example, it’s always good to ask about the structure of a firm’s training contract, as this differs from firm to firm.
  • As I mentioned, I tailored my questions to each person – when talking to a partner, I wouldn’t ask about the structure of the training contract (put that to trainees or HR), but I would ask about practice areas or the firm’s structure.

I met this firm for about 15 minutes and impressed them enough to get a place, and I can only assume this was because of my research. I was enthusiastic and interested, and it showed that I had prepared beforehand.

For more on researching employers, see the Careers Service pages about how we can help with your research. You can come into the Careers Service in person and talk to Information Specialists at our Resources Help Desk, who can help with this.

The Careers Service also runs talks on how to prepare for the Law Careers Fair. You can read our blog post about preparing for Careers Fairs and our blog post with tips for becoming a solicitor or barrister.

Don’t forget to come along to the Law Fair this year: 5 and 6 November at the Wills Memorial Building. See a list of the different firms attending each day on our website.

Lucinda, a previous Careers Service Information Assistant Intern

What are employer events?

Employers are descending to campus and they are looking to recruit you!

If you haven’t engaged with employer events before then there is no better time to start. The vast majority of employer events happen in the autumn term so you do not want to miss out! The recruitment cycle can often take almost one academic year for employers. It begins at the start of the academic year with employers coming to campus and scouting for talent. Many schemes at all levels have closing dates before Christmas. This is not just for graduate jobs, but placements, internships and even sometimes spring insight weeks and open days. You will make yourself stand out on your application by getting inside information directly from the employer. Plus, getting your foot in the door with a scheme in your first or second year can often lead to a graduate position if you perform well.

Because of the volume of employer activity on campus here are some handy definitions of the event types.

Careers Fairs

Recruitment trade show with multiple employers. You might discover companies you didn’t know existed. A good chance to explore different companies and career options and a mix of opportunities from insight days to graduate roles.

Employer Presentations

Offer detailed organisation and recruitment information. The format can range from formal presentations, interactive workshops and case studies. You will gain in depth company knowledge and a good idea if working for them is for you. There is usually a chance to network after the event with the employer and like-minded students.

Promotional Events

Casual events to raise company profile among students. These events are often the large structures placed in central indoor or outdoor locations. There is usually a fun, interactive element to them like a competition or game. Employers will be there to chat informally and promote their basic company values.

Employer-led skills sessions

Generic content workshops based around an employability skill useful to all types of professions. For example; networking, interview skills and commercial awareness. They are led by employers so students can gain a real world perspective from someone who works outside of the University context.

For some top tips for how to prepare for employer events, come to one of the ‘Making the most of Employer Events’ sessions in the Careers Service. Spaces are limited so book through our online events list.

By Maxine Robinson, Graduate Recruitment Officer.